CES Certificate/Minor

Community-Engaged Scholarship Minor/Graduate Certificate

The graduate certificate/doctoral minor in Community-Engaged Scholarship (CES), hosted by Civil Society and Community Studies with support from the Morgridge Center for Public Service, is a 9-12 credit program to train graduate students in CES, defined as teaching or research done in collaboration with community organizations or community partners in equitable, mutually beneficial, respectful relationships.

Community-Engaged Scholarship can include:

  • Community-based Learning
  • Community-based Research
  • Other community engagement and academic outreach efforts, including scholarship on CES

Through this program, students will feel confident to teach Community-based Learning courses, conduct Community-based Research, and/or lead community engagement initiatives. There are a variety of course offerings designed to meet your needs.

Not sure where to start or if this minor/certificate is for you? Visit our FAQ located at the bottom of this page.

Required Courses Include

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Best Practices in Community-Engaged Scholarship

Counseling Psychology 601

CREDITS: 2

Introduction to the practices and principles of community-engaged scholarship (Community-based Learning and Community-based Research)

Community-Based Research

Civil Society and Community Studies 570 or 811

CREDITS: 3

Participatory action research

OR


Civil Society and Community Studies 600

CREDITS: 3

Designed to demonstrate your accumulated training in community and non-profit leadership in a semester-long project done in collaboration with a community partner. The course asks how we can better conceptualize social justice and community issues from a human ecology perspective, while also learning from our own practice and experience working with nonprofit and community-based organizations. This course provides students with both a critical learning experience that combines both classroom and Community-based Learning. The course requires 28 hours of fieldwork in community settings, in addition to class sessions. It is expected that students will complete the ethnic studies requirement prior to enrolling in this course. Enroll Info: None

Capstone*

Civil Society and Community Studies 999
Credits: 1-2

In this capstone, students are asked to complete two assignments.

  1. Students will provide a portfolio detailing a community-engaged project that they participated in as the culmination of their prior minor study and engagement
  2. Students are also asked to give a public presentation on some aspect of their research, teaching, or learning related to community-engaged scholarship. This may be related to their thesis/dissertation, a course they taught, or a reflection of their own learning during this minor.

Your final portfolio may include:

  • Project description and objectives – a brief description of your project and its goals
  • Project partners and roles – describe the community partners you worked with and their roles in your work together
  • Project activities and evidence of authentic engagement – describe your collaborative work together (e.g. what was your project and what did you do as part of it?) and show evidence of the relationship-building/maintaining process (e.g. how did you develop the relationship? Did you attend meetings, do other work for them, attend community events, etc.?)
  • Outcomes and evidence of outcomes – what was the result of your project (this could be anything – completed research, an event you planned, etc.), and any evidence supporting that (what was the result of the work you did?)
  • How outcomes were shared and used by community partners and/or in academic settings – how did you share any results with your partners in the community and in the academy, if appropriate
  • Social change/benefit as a result of this project – how did this work support social action, social change, and social justice?
  • Letters from community partner in support of your work
  • Graduate Student Reflection – a summative reflection of this project and process. Some potential prompts include:
    • How did you change over the course of this work?
    • What went well?
    • What could have gone better?
    • What did you enjoy?
    • What was challenging?
    • What did you learn?
  • Any pictures/visual evidence you have

Example of capstone and final reflection:

Sandie Thao’s capstone on “Needs Assessment in a Pandemic” and final reflection on “Preschool Development Grant

Approved Elective Courses Include, But Are Not Limited To

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Agroecology

Agroecology 702

CREDITS: 3

The long term intent of this class is to build a sustainable framework for future offerings that includes community-engaged scholarship at the core, that provides an opportunity for students to learn practical and communitarian dimensions of agroecology, and that supports the interests and needs of long-term community partners engaged in multiple forms of food system reform.

Chemical and Biological Engineering

Chemical and Biological Engineering 562

CREDITS: 3

In this course, students develop and deliver educational materials for middle school students.

Civil Society and Community Studies

Civil Society and Community Studies 795

CREDITS: 3

Enhance students’ collective ability to identify, describe, and analyze power and empowerment within communities and social, economic, and political systems. This will enable us to more effectively and intentionally situate our praxis with regard to power and collective action.


Civil Society & Community Studies 813

CREDITS: 3

This course explores mixed method designs and analysis in evaluation. Students will build their skills through collaborative, utilization-focused research with key civil society institutions (e.g., community organizations, voluntary associations, foundations) within Madison and Milwaukee.

Counseling Psychology

Counseling Psychology 620: Supporting Homeless Children in Schools

CREDITS:

Through collaboration with the Madison Metropolitan School District (MMSD), Dane County Parent Council (DCPC) and UW-Madison, the overall goals of the BASES Project are to increase school-based and other educational supports for young homeless children in Madison and build the capacity of schools, teachers and families to better meet the needs of these students.

Curriculum and Instruction

Curriculum and Instruction 932: Foundations of environmental and sustainability education with Noah Weeth Feinstein

CREDITS: 3

Education is often portrayed as a critical part of the solution to the intertwined problems of environment and society—but as our understanding of those problems changes, the roles and goals of education change as well. At different historical moments, distinct visions of nature, conservation, environment, and sustainability took their turns at the center of public conversation, different ideas about the role and goals of education have also come into focus. Although some remain more visible today, none of these ideas ever really went away. The contemporary American idea of environmental education actually contains many different ideologies layered on top of each other. Understanding the key themes and internal contradictions within “environmental education” requires digging back through a fair amount of history. Through reading and discussion, we will deepen our understanding of the nature and origins of environmental education and related movements. We will learn to recognize the ideals and motifs that recur throughout 150 years of educational history, and to understand the conflicts that flare up around ideas like sustainability, natural resources, and behavior change. Although we are not primarily focused on the practical problems of curriculum and pedagogy, we will often talk about those problems and the settings in which they occur, asking how each big idea we encounter shapes the design and implementation of educational activities.

Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis

Educational Policy Studies 765: Issues in EPS with Annalee Good

CREDITS: 3

This graduate-level seminar is an introduction to education policy and policy analysis. In this course, we explore: (1) the purposes of education/policy; (2) theoretical and conceptual approaches to understanding education and analyzing policy; (3) contemporary models of education policy, and (4) the act of policy analysis. While focused on K-12 education policy in the United States, the course is organized to examine key ideas useful for thinking about the history of education, higher education and comparative international education.


Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis 770

CREDITS: 3

Critical examination of school-community engagement and collaboration. This course examines theory and practice of mutually beneficial collaboration in diverse education settings, including leadership issues in collaborative settings, and facilitators and inhibitors to effective collaboration.


Educational Policy Studies 780

CREDITS: 3

This course provides students with the opportunity to engage with and discuss the historical, ideological, and contemporary issues surrounding community-based spaces and programs serving youth. Topics will include: grassroots organizing and activism, pedagogies of the home, academic outcomes and access to higher education, full-service community-schools/school-community partnerships, social identity, funding and philanthropy, neoliberalism and education privatization, and afterschool and out-of-school time education.


Education Policy Studies 810: Education and Resistance in Community-based Spaces

CREDITS: 3

Broadly, the purpose of the course is to provide students with the opportunity to engage with and discuss the historical, ideological, and contemporary issues surrounding community-based spaces and programs engaging youth. Drawing upon theoretical and empirical literature, students will be asked to think critically about the ways in which political and social context shapes the construction and culture of these spaces.

Geography

Geography 675 – Feminist methodologies with Jenna Loyd

CREDITS: 3

This course introduces students to foundational approaches to feminist qualitative research in human geography. Methodological approaches are not separate from the theoretical frameworks that inform research questions, including theories of social change. That is, epistemology, or how we know what we know, informs a particular methodology, or approach to asking and answering questions using particular methods, or tools for systematically constructing, collecting, and analyzing findings or “data.” Research is not separate from a social world that historically has been and continues to be shaped by (settler) colonial, racialized, gendered, sexualized, and class-inflected relations of power (among others). Research practices and “findings” have been and continues to be used to inform and rationalize relations of oppression, exploitation, and violence. For feminist researchers, then, questions of power, difference, and social change are central to how we design and conduct research. Accordingly, this class will ask what are the relationships of feminist geographic inquiry to liberatory projects of ending racism, capitalism, settler colonialism, and heteropatriarchy? This course will center insights developed by feminist, decolonial, and other critical research practices. Students will engage in political-ethical discussions about the positionality and responsibilities of ourselves as researchers, and how our knowledge production can reproduce and challenge prevailing relations of power. This class complements and extends Geography 504; while that course is not a prerequisite for the course, I do expect some familiarity with feminist theory from other courses or from your own reading and practice.

Interdisciplinary Courses

InterHE 815

CREDITS: 1

Titles/content varies

Kinesiology

Kinesiology 501 – Theory-based health education and health promotion with Susan Andreae

CREDITS: 3

Will provide an overview of behavioral, social, and cultural factors related to individual and population health and health disparities. Social and behavioral science theories and strategies in health promotion/education will be discussed in relation to preventing disease and promoting health. Is intended to provide students with the current knowledge and analysis of issues influencing people’s health and well-being from a social and behavioral science perspective. Theoretical frameworks that draw on major health behavior theories will provide a better understanding of how individuals, families, peers, schools, neighborhoods, and the larger community influence risk and protective factors. Ethical considerations intrinsic to social and behavioral science efforts designed to produce health-related behavior change will be discussed.  Will promote intellectual and collaborative learning through course lectures, readings, class discussions, and individual and group work.

Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture 590: Engaging the Community in Public Decisions

This course combines lectures, class discussions and exercises, and assignments to examine public participation for planning and policymaking in both urban and natural environments.  Students will learn how to design, conduct and evaluate public participation processes and techniques. The class will discuss the ethics and values around public engagement; the interplay between professional and local knowledge; ways to increase access for those often marginalized; and emerging topics and trends in the practice of public participation.  Active class participation is expected.


Landscape Architecture 668: Restoration ecology

CREDITS: 3

The long term intent of this class is to build a sustainable framework for future offerings that includes community-engaged scholarship at the core, that provides an opportunity for students to learn practical and communitarian dimensions of agroecology, and that supports the interests and needs of long-term community partners engaged in multiple forms of food system reform.

Life Sciences Communication

Life Sciences Communication 617: Health Communication in the Digital Age

CREDITS: 3

This course examines risk as a central concept in the communication process. Since risk is intrinsically an interdisciplinary concept, the course will rely on literature from a wide range of disciplines and perspectives, such as communication, psychology, sociology and formal risk analysis.


Life Sciences Communication 625: Risk Communication

CREDITS: 3

This course examines risk as a central concept in the communication process. Since risk is intrinsically an interdisciplinary concept, the course will rely on literature from a wide range of disciplines and perspectives, such as communication, psychology, sociology and formal risk analysis.

Population Health

Population Health 780

CREDITS: 3

An interdisciplinary graduate-level course addressing population-based approaches to community health improvement, and features problem-based learning. A focus on contemporary issues; opportunities to work with a public health mentor and lectures by local, state and national figures. Enroll Info: Enrollment in the Master of Public Health (MPH) program at UW-Madison, Grad st, or cons inst

Public Affairs

Public Affairs 860: Workshop in International Public Affairs

This course examines public management in democracy and works with a community partner to develop solutions for management problems.


Public Affairs 869: Workshop in Public Affairs

This workshop examines public management in democracy and works with a community partner to develop solutions for management problems.


Public Affairs 871: Public Program Evaluation

Compares the conceptual, statistical, and ethical issues of experimental, quasi-experimental and non-experimental designs for program evaluation. Definitions of outcomes, sample size issues, statistical biases in measuring causal effects of programs, and the reliability of findings will be emphasized using case studies selected from current public programs.


Public Affairs 881: Cost-Benefit Analysis

Presents the welfare economics underpinnings for evaluating the social benefits and costs of government activities. Issues such as uncertainty, the social discount rate, and welfare weights will be discussed; case studies from the environmental, social policy, and agricultural areas will be studied.

FAQ

Who is this for?
We developed this certificate/minor for graduate students all across campus who are interested in learning more about (and getting credit for!) community-engaged work and integrating community engagement into their research, teaching, and learning. You do not need prior experience in CES or ongoing projects with community partners, although many students do have some experience and community relationships as they enter the program. We welcome students from every department and discipline.

What does the certificate/minor look like in practice?
The certificate/minor is 9-12 credits: three required courses and one or two electives. The required courses are a 2-credit seminar overview of community-engaged scholarship, a 3-credit community-based research methods course, and a 1-3 credit (you determine the credit load) capstone course. Additionally, you can choose one or two electives. If you have an idea for an appropriate elective course that is not listed here, please contact Haley Madden.

How much time does it take?
You can plan out your courses in whatever time frame works for you, but you can complete the certificate/minor in as little time as one year. There is no set sequence of courses, although CP 601 is a good course to start with.

How do I take the capstone credits?
You have a few options for completing the capstone credits:

  1. If you are already working on a community-engaged project of some kind, you can take those credits through your advisor, PI, or supervisor.
  2. If you are working on a community-engaged project outside of the work with your advisor, we can connect you with a faculty member in Civil Society and Community Studies to supervise those credits.
  3. If you are not working on a community-engaged project, we can connect you with a project with a CSCS faculty member. You can reach out directly to a CSCS faculty member or we can help develop that connection.

Who do I contact with any other questions?
Assistant Director of Community-Engaged Scholarship Haley Madden.