Latino Youth Summit

Community-Engaged Scholarship Minor/Graduate Certificate

The graduate certificate/doctoral minor in Community-Engaged Scholarship (CES), hosted by Civil Society and Community Studies with support from the Morgridge Center for Public Service, is a 9-12 credit program to train graduate students in CES, defined as teaching or research done in collaboration with community organizations or community partners in equitable, mutually beneficial, respectful relationships.

Community-Engaged Scholarship can include:

  • Community-based Learning
  • Community-based Research
  • Other community engagement and academic outreach efforts, including scholarship on CES

Through this program, students will feel confident to teach community-based learning courses, conduct Community-based Research, and/or lead community engagement initiatives. There are a variety of course offerings designed to meet your needs.

Required Courses Include

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Best Practices in Community-Engaged Scholarship

Counseling Psychology 601

CREDITS: 2

Introduction to the practices and principles of community-engaged scholarship (Community-based Learning and Community-based Research)

Community-Based Research

Civil Society and Community Studies 570 OR 811

CREDITS: 3

Participatory action research


Civil Society and Community Studies 600

CREDITS: 3

Designed to demonstrate your accumulated training in community and non-profit leadership in a semester-long project done in collaboration with a community partner. The course asks how we can better conceptualize social justice and community issues from a human ecology perspective, while also learning from our own practice and experience working with nonprofit and community-based organizations. This course provides students with both a critical learning experience that combines both classroom and Community-based Learning. The course requires 28 hours of fieldwork in community settings, in addition to class sessions. It is expected that students will complete the ethnic studies requirement prior to enrolling in this course. Enroll Info: None

Capstone*

Civil Society and Community Studies 999

CREDITS: 1-2

In this capstone, students are asked to complete two assignments.

  1. Students will provide a portfolio detailing a community-engaged project that they participated in as the culmination of their prior minor study and engagement
  2. Students are also asked to give a public presentation on some aspect of their research, teaching, or learning related to community-engaged scholarship. This may be related to their thesis/dissertation, a course they taught, or a reflection of their own learning during this minor.

Approved Elective Courses Include, But Are Not Limited To

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Agroecology

Agroecology 702

CREDITS: 3

The long term intent of this class is to build a sustainable framework for future offerings that includes community-engaged scholarship at the core, that provides an opportunity for students to learn practical and communitarian dimensions of agroecology, and that supports the interests and needs of long-term community partners engaged in multiple forms of food system reform.

Chemical and Biological Engineering

Chemical and Biological Engineering 562

CREDITS: 3

In this course, students develop and deliver educational materials for middle school students.

Civil Society and Community Studies

Civil Society and Community Studies 795

CREDITS: 3

Enhance students’ collective ability to identify, describe, and analyze power and empowerment within communities and social, economic, and political systems. This will enable us to more effectively and intentionally situate our praxis with regard to power and collective action.


Civil Society & Community Studies 813

CREDITS: 3

This course explores mixed method designs and analysis in evaluation. Students will build their skills through collaborative, utilization-focused research with key civil society institutions (e.g., community organizations, voluntary associations, foundations) within Madison and Milwaukee.

Counseling Psychology

Counseling Psychology 620: Supporting Homeless Children in Schools

CREDITS: 2

Through collaboration with the Madison Metropolitan School District (MMSD), Dane County Parent Council (DCPC) and UW-Madison, the overall goals of the BASES Project are to increase school-based and other educational supports for young homeless children in Madison and build the capacity of schools, teachers and families to better meet the needs of these students.

Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis

Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis 770

CREDITS: 3

Critical examination of school-community engagement and collaboration. This course examines theory and practice of mutually beneficial collaboration in diverse education settings, including leadership issues in collaborative settings, and facilitators and inhibitors to effective collaboration.


Educational Policy Studies 780

CREDITS: 3

This course provides students with the opportunity to engage with and discuss the historical, ideological, and contemporary issues surrounding community-based spaces and programs serving youth. Topics will include: grassroots organizing and activism, pedagogies of the home, academic outcomes and access to higher education, full-service community-schools/school-community partnerships, social identity, funding and philanthropy, neoliberalism and education privatization, and afterschool and out-of-school time education.


Education Policy Studies 810: Education and Resistance in Community-based Spaces

CREDITS: 3

Broadly, the purpose of the course is to provide students with the opportunity to engage with and discuss the historical, ideological, and contemporary issues surrounding community-based spaces and programs engaging youth. Drawing upon theoretical and empirical literature, students will be asked to think critically about the ways in which political and social context shapes the construction and culture of these spaces.

Interdisciplinary Courses

InterHE 815

CREDITS: 1

Titles/content varies

Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture 668: Restoration ecology

CREDITS: 3

The long term intent of this class is to build a sustainable framework for future offerings that includes community-engaged scholarship at the core, that provides an opportunity for students to learn practical and communitarian dimensions of agroecology, and that supports the interests and needs of long-term community partners engaged in multiple forms of food system reform.

Life Sciences Communication

Life Sciences Communication 625: Risk Communication

CREDITS: 3

This course examines risk as a central concept in the communication process. Since risk is intrinsically an interdisciplinary concept, the course will rely on literature from a wide range of disciplines and perspectives, such as communication, psychology, sociology and formal risk analysis.

Population Health

Population Health 780

CREDITS: 3

An interdisciplinary graduate-level course addressing population-based approaches to community health improvement, and features problem-based learning. A focus on contemporary issues; opportunities to work with a public health mentor and lectures by local, state and national figures. Enroll Info: Enrollment in the Master of Public Health (MPH) program at UW-Madison, Grad st, or cons inst

Public Affairs

Public Affairs 860: Workshop in International Public Affairs

This course examines public management in democracy and works with a community partner to develop solutions for management problems.


Public Affairs 869: Workshop in Public Affairs

This workshop examines public management in democracy and works with a community partner to develop solutions for management problems.


Public Affairs 871: Public Program Evaluation

Compares the conceptual, statistical, and ethical issues of experimental, quasi-experimental and non-experimental designs for program evaluation. Definitions of outcomes, sample size issues, statistical biases in measuring causal effects of programs, and the reliability of findings will be emphasized using case studies selected from current public programs.


Public Affairs 881: Cost-Benefit Analysis

Presents the welfare economics underpinnings for evaluating the social benefits and costs of government activities. Issues such as uncertainty, the social discount rate, and welfare weights will be discussed; case studies from the environmental, social policy, and agricultural areas will be studied.